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20130801
20130831
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i. once we got past 63 and 64 in saint augustine when the mob turned on the press and in mississippi when people like all good got fired by abc because he would not cover -- abc was still running the story, forgive me, that these three civil rights workers were hiding to get attention and he knew that they had been killed. he lost his job over that. i had to pull nelson at and out of a mob in saint augustine to keep them from being enough. a danish reporter got hit in the camera either by a baseball at and knocked his eye socket out. it was ruthless and brutal for the press. press.s the national the written press never quite believed what they saw. to have press conferences at 9:00 in the morning to say what we were going to do and then the demonstrations would start around 1030 and that 1:00, we would tell them what we did, why we did it, and we would answer questions but they would still -- they could not believe that martin luther king was as , as much of aent selfless man that he actually was. >> in 1961, may 20, when we arrived in montgomery during the freedom ride at the greyho
on the south. i said, if we do not see meaningful progress, we will march through virginia, through mississippi and several other places. do your a member? >> i remember all that. i was donated to the march on washington committee and my task was distributing john's speech, the original speech to murmurs of the press who were seated down below lincoln, still above on the steps. i passed out these copies of john's speech and pointed out to them, that john would be the only speaker speaking that day who talk about black people instead of negroes or colored people as was the fashion. i thought and we thought that this demonstrated how militant we were and how different we were and better and superior we were from the other civil rights organizations. none of the reporters made any objection. [laughter] >> what did you mean by militant? >> i meant aggressive. nothing harmful or violent. i have always been upset by people who say, they are so militant. they equate it with violence. it is not necessarily equitable with violence. it just means somebody is it aggressively in pursuit of his ideas. we th
for the head start association. our office is located is -- our office is located in jackson, mississippi. i've been with head start since 1980 and am excited to be here today to share some of our concerns about sequestration. >> martha coven, associate director for education and community and labor at the office of management and budget which is part of the executive office of the president. so we on behalf of the present over to the budget for the number of federal agencies including education. the ministry for children and families at hhs where the head start progress. >> i'm the director of policy and planning at the office of head start within the department of health and human services and the start of the early childhood career 20 years ago in head start agency in brooklyn. so i'm really happy to be here today. >> i'm sharon parrott from the center on budget and policy priorities were on the vice president's budget policy and economic opportunity. this is the second go-round for me at the center on budget and just prior to returning in november i worked for secretaries and police at t
every hill of mississippi and from every mountainside. let freedom ring, and when it happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and from every state and every city we will be able to speed up the day that all of us black men and white men choose power and we will be able to join hands and sing in the old spirit of free at last, free at last. thank god almighty we are free at last. [applause] >> on a sunday morning in september of 1963, for young black girls attended sunday school at the 16th st. storch church. the bible lesson was a love that for dallas. the girl moved to the basement when suddenly an always went through the church like a cannon. the bomb planted near the basement went through the house of worship. they toppled a gruesome discovery. sandia, age 14, carroll robertson, age 14. addy mae colins and denise age 11 all were found dead, their bodies buried atop one another. >> it's great to be visible all through dallas. >> it will only be a matter of minutes before he arrives at the turnpike. >> they got in the newsroom and as perhaps you
to go south of richmond. just the way i was cultivated and mississippi was a scary place because emmitt till was murdered there. and i still remember ibm blacked and when we go together i wonder what people think and all day ever say is come back. i remember you from your service and never sure president. but i was a little gun shy with how i was brought up but we had a wonderful time. >> calling on the republican line. >> caller: with a race race, every time a black person kills a white person and it is o.k. but if a white person kills a black person they set out it is a race. it is not race all the time. we are past all that we need to except people who they are and quit complaining. >> guest: who is complaining? >> caller: the blacks always complain. >> guest: whitey think we're always explaining our circumstances? >> caller: they just complain get over the past. >> guest: you are from the south. you're from the south to the seveners get over the loss of the confederate war of the state's? >> caller: i am past that. the south lost. >> host: can you give us a little bit of your histor
hill of mississippi. there was one place that dr. king did not mention, about which he later spoke of. that was the district of columbia. that is because full freedom and democracy were and are still denied to the people who quite literally live within the site of the capitol dome. our city is home to more residents than the state of vermont and wyoming. but we have no voting representative in our own congress. we pay more than $3.5 billion a year in federal taxes. we don't even get the final say over how we spend our own locally raised money. we send our sons and daughters to fight for democracy overseas, but don't get to practice it fully here at home. today, as we remember those who gave so much have a century ago to extend the blessings of liberty to all americans, i implore and hope that all of you will stand with me when i say that we must let freedom ring from mount saint alban, where rises the majestic national cathedral. we must let freedom ring from the bridges of anacostia. we must let freedom ring from capitol hill itself, until all of the residents of the very seat of our
office is located in jackson mississippi. i have been with a head start since 1988 and i am excited to be here today to share some of our concerns about sequestration . >> i'm the associate director for education income maintenance of labor, part of the executive office of the president. we oversee the budgets of a number of federal agencies including education and the administration for children family. >> and the director of policy and planning. i started my 20 years ago. i'm really happy to be it today. >> was president budgets, policy, and economic cover tentative. i worked for secretary sibila is set the department of health and human services. >> i'm the managing director for economic policy here at the center for american progress. deficits and debt. >> was wondering if we could start with you. we heard numbers mentioned in the introduction. i wonder he might drill down on the more. the office has some additional information. maybe even what we might be seeing if sequestration continues. >> let me start. our topline numbers of children now. that's about 6,000 infants and todd
, mississippi. and many may relate to that. the death of those three civil rights workers there. but you also relate the fact that there was many others all across the great state of mississippi and in other southern states who sacrificed as well. and so share some of your opinions on the ideal of galvanizing the college youth. >> we followed the tradition as college students of young people and college students all over the world. when you talk about changing the social order, it is usually the young people, the young, educated people who will generally spear that particular change. -- spearhead that particular change. so we followed that same historical tradition. when, we know about the three civil rights workers who were murdered, but during that same period from june, i think, through september a total of 7 other blacks -- 27 other blacks, young black males, were murdered in mississippi. i related the you the story of two students at alcorn college who were just coming back to the campus from downtown, and two carloads of klansmen kidnapped them, and they found be their bodies, i think,
to mississippi. and we were there. and then we went up to birmingham, alabama, we were there. we heard the same story time and time again. a woman is being abused. the neighbor woman calls up and ghesz who goes to jail? the person who calls them the abuser. the man turns around and says that woman doesn't have papers. what does law enforcement do? that's why you have to separate law enforcement from immigration policy. the police is there to protect the people. they have to protect the women and the families. we have to understand how safety has a corrosive effect. the police -- their cars are important to them, to protect us. their guns are important to them to protect us, their communication, their training is important. but the most important tool, instrument that the police have? it's the people and the cooperation of the people. and when you pass immigration law, they criminalize all immigrants and make them fear the police, you make all of us less safe. and you make us all a nation in which we perpetrate injustice of our people here who have been submitted to crimes and to criminals. so,
klux klan skyrockets, you have the mississippi codes, which began in 1877 and were crystallized in 1901. it deprived blacks of being able to own property. restricts voting rights. for example, in mississippi. and i think in 1871, 97% of african-american men can vote in the state of mississippi. when hayes and's reconstruction, 10 years later, less than 1.5% of african-american men can the.the violence, intimidation, the grandfather's clause, the poll tax. it is really two separate nations where african-americans emboldened by frederick douglass in the north began to really organize and begin to secure the rights while the south have theirs stripped away.>> mike is watching us in honolulu. you are on. go ahead. >> can you hear me? >> yes, thanks. >> it is hawaii standard time. i have a direct relative to my grandmother, of course.her name is jesse hayes. she was born in 1870. in the lower midwest.probably, by blood, long removed. i looked at this beautiful lucy sitting in the chair, looking at the camera with those big eyes, and her beautiful children looking at the camera. obviously,mpr
of free four little girls in a birmingham church and the chicago teenager on vacation in mississippi. it is a new day 50 years later and a better day, but the day is not over. today struggle for civil rights, social justice, and economic opportunity to man our engagement and our voice. to realize fully our dream we must raise our voices and take action. we must lift our voices to challenge government and our community and neighbors to be better. we must lift our voices for wages that enable families to take care of themselves, for a health care system that erases disparities, for communities and homes without violence, for clean air and water to protect our environment for future generations, and for a just justice system. we must lift our voice for the value of our boat and have our votes counted without interference. as we stand here today, dr. king would know, and john lewis certainly knows, that today is not just a commemoration or celebration. it is a call to action for the work remains undone in the communities that remain unchanged. our foremothers and forefathers 50 years ago
the context here and the whole climate was set. jim was in jail than mississippi. the sheriff's told the black inmates either beat her or we will be to you. so they beat her unconscious. so there were 200 demonstrations of the country that day and people going to jail. the public accommodations bill, the dream was the right to vote. the dream of 66 was in chicago for housing. the treen at 67 was the poor people's campaign to end the war mike in vietnam. dr. king made the case from 32% down to 12 on the lyndon johnson war on poverty. by the way, our hearts were trained with pain johnson had no background on civil rights. only the civil rights legislator in the history of the country and passed with lyndon johnson and 64 kuhl of the voting rights act of 65, daycare, child-care, speeding programs, appellations, the regional council, all of that is lbj. the record matches are lyndon baines johnson. the speech is always around. from the last staff meeting it went something like this. i had a migraine headache for nine days and maybe my time is up. maybe i've done as much as i could do. maybe i shou
, -- another one, holding a town hall this evening in mississippi -- he posts a picture on instagram of the folks coming into that town hall in mississippi. also this evening, john boehner is holding a conference call with republicans. politico reports on that. the headline -- they write the republican leadership hold a conference this evening. topics expected to be discussed include immigration reform legislation, government funding and the debt ceiling, and those issues are expected to be top priorities in the fall. they said conference calls of this nature are typical during long recesses. the house has been out of session for three weeks and does not return to washington until september 9. back to calls. caller: hi. my son is a student going to college. he is going to a private college. my husband and i are both middle-class americans. i am a teacher. the costs are daunting. by the time he is done with school completely, $250,000 in loans. he wants to be an orthopedic surgeon. >> right. caller: of course you when you talk to move ahead and break those barriers. we get a bill in t
but a few structures of the mississippi river valley and the reoccupied western tennessee. in the east ready lee led his ragtag confederate forces, the army of northern virginia to one victory after another of their opposite number. but the victories were all one on virginia soil. and in feeble, the virginia economy even as they defend it. he knew better than any southerner that the confederacy's resources or to limited to keep fending off the confederacy's enemies in definitely. only by carrying the war into the union states and only by leveraging of war weariness public into peace negotiations can the confederacy hope to win. but this was by no means a far fetched up. in the fall of 1862 dissension over president abraham lincoln's emancipation proclamation had cost unhappy voters in new york and new jersey to install democratic governors they're come a new round of anti-war democratic candidates to were due to run in the fall of 1863 governors' elections in ohio and pennsylvania. if those states also turned against the war they could force of abraham lincoln either to begin peace talks or
, they essentially came the storm troopers of the movement. able to the mississippi delta were other organizations were afraid to go. certainly her. fannie lou hamer after the mississippi delta, sharecropping family, ma who, by her own account, by report went to school only one day, created, in her entire life. i would are used by one of the most eloquent spokespersons for the aims of the movement. a speech that she gave at the democratic national convention in 1964, you can you do it. if you have not heard it, here it. because it is the most eloquent statement that i have heard, courageous woman and is deathly her paper think if we move from a national level to the local level, the list grows and grows. one of, i was the one of the most exciting things about being sort of doing this history, being involved in a scholarly production of literacy about the civil rights movement is about a lot of really good stuff that is coming out that's talked about his local activists, were anonymous for the most part but without them he would not affect a national movement. and i think it was to go back to the p
. louisiana, mississippi, what is happening in some of those states? >> that is an important point, one of the interesting demographic changes in america over the last 25 years. the expert we will hear from later. traditionally, immigrants have gone to the south, other than -- shunned the south, other than texas. that has been a problem. now, you are seeing dixie really attracting a lot of the immigrant states like north carolina. one of the states with the biggest percentage increase of immigration over the last 15 years has been georgia. it has become a high-growth state. people at, are immigrants more attracted to a state with high welfare benefits, or are they attracted to a state that has jobs? we look at some of the evidence, and what we found was, on balance, immigrants are much more likely to go to states with unemployment rates than they are to go to states with welfare. they are coming here because they want a job, not a welfare check. >> it makes logical sense. if you are to leave your country and make out somewhere new -- >> there are so many people on the other side of the
. that is a long time in coming. it is beginning at this time. >> headers on the phone from jackson,, mississippi. what is your question? >> i would like to know who ran against james k. polk when he as running for president and did sarah polk play the part? >> polk runs against henry clay from kentucky. clay had run twice again before this. he thinks it is his turn. he expects it will be a cake walk, because nobody has heard of jim spoke. he makes a number of mistakes during the campaign, and in the end, in a very close vote, clay loses to polk. oddly enough, he carries polk's home state. >> the issue of a presidential campaign at that time, very different from what we see today. it was considered a proper for the candidate to be called to office. active campaigning went to state offices like the governor. the candidates did not show up at the nominating conventions, afterwards when the were drafted and accepted the nomination, air with letters and the editor, but very little stump -- no stumping at all. sarah was her husband's campaign manager for his congressional campaign and gubernatorial ca
collapsed in the middle of the mississippi river. as i said, that day, a bridge just shouldn't fall down in the middle of america. not an eight-lane bridge in the middle of rush hour and not a bridge six blocks from my house. that's what happened. people were killed. hundreds were injured. you know what we do when it does break down, when that happens in america? we rebuild. we rebuilt that bridge less than months. we rebuilt like they're rebuilding in new jersey after hurricane sandy. we rebuild like you did in iowa after the iowa floods. we rebuild because that's what a good government does. it funds public safety and infrastructure and it doesn't shortchange our roads and our bridges and our locks and our dams. so where do you think the senate passed bipartisan water bill, the water resources development act. where do you think it is? it's is it you can in the house of representatives another example. after decades of immigrants living in the shadows, kids who lived in our military denied citizenship. engineers and doctors and scientists denied industry. the senate passed a bipartisan
of frank sinatra. ms. cel-- mississippi kelley's most recent book, "capturing camelot." very well photographed, obviously, and very well put together. personally, these picture books mean a lot more to me when the captions are well researched and thought out and a bit more prose than you would normally find which is what ms. kelley did with this book. never failing to raise a few eyebrows while uncovering stories and doing such a wonderfully painful job of reminding us our heroes are very, very human, please welcome to the festival kitty kelley. [applause] >> the only part of that introduction that isn't quite right is the prolific. it takes me four years -- >> i heard it from someone. >> no, you've got to be careful. [laughter] prolific as a turtle. it takes me four years usually on each book. but this one, this book was a labor of love because stanley tretick was one of my very best friends, and he was one of president kennedy's favorite photographers. and i used to go visit stanley in washington. and one time i asked him what he had in the marine corps locker that he used as hi
of my favorite images of dr. king is from 1966 in mississippi when he is marching with stokely carmichael wright once told it was about to drop the phrase yellow, black power. dr. king because he was not jealous or insecure or disrespectful for younger people, we need to say that, even though he was a nobel peace prize winner, he had let the march on washington to get done all these incredible things. he listened to this younger rather than stokely carmichael explain why we should not call ourselves negroes anymore and embrace black power. dr. king felt like because he's a leader in the think it's important we define what a leader is. she or he because no more of the male stuff as i said, she or he changes the direction of the conversation, comes up with a nubile kegger. what did dr. king say? okay, i'm going to write an essay which anyone industry should read because you want to know what the blueprint is? it's called black power redefined by dr. king. part of the problem is we get so stuck in 1963, evolves and changes in again to put some teeth on his vision is our target ins
in the south like louisiana, mississippi. you know, what's happening in some of those states in terms of -- is that helping or hurting? >> that's a really important point. this is kind of one of the interesting demographic changes in america over the last 25 years. richard vedder is the expert on this who you'll hear from later. traditionally, immigrants have shunned the south other than texas. in fact, that's been a problem for growth in the south for a hundred, since the end of the civil war. now you're seeing dixie attracting the immigrant states like north carolina. one of the states that has had the biggest percentage increase in immigration over last 15 years has been georgia. and georgia actually has become a high growth state. and this gets to the point people ask are immigrants more attracted to a state that has high welfare went fits -- benefits or to a state that has jobs. and so we rooked at some of -- we looked at some of this evidence, and what we found was on balance immigrants are much more likely to go to states with low unemployment rates than they are to go to the s
is katrina, read the, gustav, ike, the mississippi oil spill, recently tropical storm isaac. some of the concerns we have is how can we evacuate have the coast line in a 38 hour period i know who to go to and how long it is going to take. how many will be evacuated or not, how many can help themselves, how many will be the state's assistance, how many of those will need federal assistance? i can tell you. and even less night. all of a sudden i found myself not coming up with words and anxious about what i would say to u.s. policy makers and by fire that we are asking for your help to advocate for the dollars to be returned because of the things that i know, in terms of operations. and i can tell you just from the american red cross has a 23 sq. feet per person that wouldn't come up with capacity numbers for rebuilding that has been increasing as recommendations are made through groups such as yourself. we should have various things for children so that capacity is now increasing to about 52 square foot per person. what does that mean in terms of operations? that means the number o
. the author of several historical novels he spoke from the more than an hour in jackson, mississippi. >> the reason for me to be in jackson this time more so than in the weather is what took place about 40 miles west of here which is what i want to talk about tonight at vicksburg. i mean, this is quite a story and it is a story that some people around here don't know. that is great fun for me, but i need to start out talking about something that i always mention. whenever i am doing in the event like this, i am quite sure that at least some of you have some interest in the civil war for one reason because some time many years ago you wrote a book called the killer angels. every time i say that people not there had. if you have no idea what that is , that's okay. is not required. we will explain it to you. threatened by my father, cannot in 1974. it is the story of the battle of gettysburg. now, with the killer angels' is not is the history of the battle of gettysburg. this is not a history book will. it's a story as told to you from the characters themselves. the people is decisions
assassinations the whole climate faugh -- it was not here because she was beaten in mississippi. the shares sold the black inmate , either we be hurt horribly you. so 200 demonstrations around the country. a public accommodation bill. the right to vote. chicago fair housing. the poor people's campaign to end the war in vietnam. now that made the case. we took poverty from 32 percent down to 12 from under lyndon johnson. by the way, drained his pain that johnson had more background and civil rights. only to become the most prolific solarized legislator in the history of our country. only lincoln compares with lyndon johnson. lyndon johnson was 64. the voting rights act of 65, day care, child care, workers' feeding program, appellation, original counsel, all of that is lbj. too seldom mentioned that major conventions of democrats today. no democratic record matches that of lyndon baines johnson. now, i would make this appeal, and i do close, one is that the speech was always around this day. the high moment of the dream and the low moment of memphis. and in the last staff meeting it went something
california or new york but louisiana, mississippi. >> that is the important point the interesting immigration graphic you would hear from the experts later but traditionally immigrants have shunned the south of man has been a problem that now use the dixie's like north carolina wednesday with the biggest percentage increase is georgia. that has become the high-growth state to the point where people ask our immigrants more attracted to a state with high welfare benefits or to the state that has jobs? what we have found is on balance democrats are more likely to go to low unemployment rates than with high welfare benefits which is the important timing because people are coming here because they want a job the. >> and it does make sense if you leave your country. >> it does make sense but there is so many people on the other side of this issue that the immigrants come here for welfare. some do but the vast majority do not. >> a very important point. >> so now with the international experts the author of a chapter of the bush institutes solutions looking at growth and immigration and evidence she
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)